FurEver United Rescue is a foster-based rescue, which means we do not have a facility to intake animals into. We assess which dogs we will be able to accept into our rescue on a case-by-case basis. We always recommend that you first try to rehome your pet first before surrendering your pet to a shelter.

Finding a new home for your pet allows you to play an important role in the next chapter of their life. By responsibly choosing a new home for your pet, they will be much less stressed and confused by avoiding a stay at the shelter and you will be helping save space in our rescue for animals who truly need our help. Surrendering your pet to the shelter should be your last resort, so consider finding them a suitable new owner, completing a home check, and also verifying vet records to ensure your pet is going to be taken care of.

If you decide that rehoming your pet is the best option, keep in mind that despite the best efforts of shelters and rescues to care for their animals, your home is usually the best place for your pet while you search for an adopter. By taking on the task of finding your pet a home, you can also reduce competition for limited space and resources in shelters or rescues. Here are some tips for placing your pet in a loving new home.

  • Make your pet more attractive to potential adopters. Have your pet vaccinated, spayed/neutered, on flea and heartworm prevention, and checked by a veterinarian. 

  • Advertise through friends, neighbors and local veterinarians. Your personal network is the best pool of adopters for your pet. Ask your veterinarian if you can place a poster advertising your pet’s need for a new home. Place flyers promoting your pet at work, school, church and other public places you frequent. Include a good-quality photo and appealing description of your pet.

  • Leverage your social network. Post your pet’s photo and story and ask your friends to share it on their social streams.

  • Be transparent with potential adopters. Be prepared to share details about your pet's personality and how they get along with other pets and people. Share your pet’s favorite things and not-so-favorite things. And share any medical or behavior issues your pet is experiencing so that potential new owners will have the information they need to determine if your pet would be a good fit for their family.

  • Get help from shelters and rescue groups. Some sheltering and rescue organizations may post your pet’s picture and profile on their website as a courtesy listing, while your pet stays in your home. Your local agencies may have other programs to help you rehome your pet.
     

As a last resort, you may be able to surrender your pet to a local shelter or rescue organization. Each agency may have a different process for surrendering a pet to their care; learn more by visiting their website or by calling ahead.

Resources:

Home to Home: a direct-to-adopter tool for pet guardians looking to re-home their animal.

https://home-home.org/shelter/corpus-christi-animal-care-services/

Adopt-A-Pet: a rehoming website that allows you to post your pet for free, review applications, screen potential adopters, upload vet documents, and finalize adoptions.

https://www.adoptapet.com/

Local rescues with shelter facilities:

 

Corpus Christi Animal Care Services: Corpus Christi city shelter facility

https://www.cctexas.com/services/animal-services/surrender-your-pet